Universal Access To All Knowledge
Home Donate | Store | Blog | FAQ | Jobs | Volunteer Positions | Contact | Bios | Forums | Projects | Terms, Privacy, & Copyright
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload

Reply to this post | See parent post | Go Back
View Post [edit]

Poster: AltheaRose Date: Jul 10, 2011 5:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

>L.A. is to San Diego, Phoenix, Vegas, Fresno & Bakersfield what Denver is to Cheyenne, Salt Lake, Albuquerque, western Kansas and Omaha, Chicago is to Milwaukee, Madison, St. Paul, Des Moines, St. Louis and Indianapolis.

Oh come on. Denver and Salt Lake City? That's something like 8, 10 hours. Chicago to St Louis is 5 to 6 hours. Chicago to St Paul is about eight hours. That's like saying the Dead played really good "in and around Cleveland Land" cuz that Raven Space show in Baltimore in '82 was really good.

Obviously people did drive those distances for shows. As I recall, I went from Chicago to Milwaukee in '80 for a show and came back; went to Indianapolis in '79 and stayed in a hotel. I just mapquested that (not having a detailed memory about the length of the drive) and I guess the reason was that Milwaukee is like 1.5 hours and Indianapolis is like 3 hours.

Don't have an opinion on DeKalb. Probably close enough for government work, as they say. Maybe just call it Northern Illinois and everyone will agree. I guess radio station broadcasts is as good a marker as any, particularly cuz radio really did seem to matter in those days. Though I don't recall WLS or WGN.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: dark.starz Date: Jul 10, 2011 1:22pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

In terms of "National Distribution" and regional hubs, Salt Lake City is considered a part of the Rocky Mountain Territory, and St. Paul & St. Louis are considered part of the Midwest Territory.

Never said St. Paul & St. Louis were part of the "Chicago Land" area, was simply stating an example of regional territory's.

When planning a national tour many acts begin with the major cities and fill in shows in secondary markets as needed.





This post was modified by dark.starz on 2011-07-10 20:22:57

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: duckpond74 Date: Jul 10, 2011 10:28am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

AR, I agree, this is ridiculous. I was born in Chicago and raised in the city and nearby. When I returned to the Chicago area mid 70's, my wife and I would often comment on how 'geocentric' and downright pretentious the term - and 'mindset' - 'Chicago Land' seemed. How frustrating it was, night after night, to turn on the evening news shows, and not get any news of consequence that occurred outside of that 30 - 35 mile radius. Sometimes it felt that the media assumed - for us all - that nothing must be happening outside of that zone. Dekalb and Normal both exceed that perimeter / parameter of distance and urban mindset. Poplar Creek would have been right on the rim of that 'zone'. It was a frustration not to see major regional and national news covered - outside of the network evening national news shows.

Though WGN and WLS have always had strong, far reaching signals, they have long supported this geocentric 'Chicagoland' mindset and attitude. They would be the two sets of call letters that someone from outside of the area might be familiar with.

The show in Dekalb was announced weeks before the date. I remember, because I had recently moved back to northern Illinois - living just outside of the perceived 'Chicagoland' umbrella, and I recall trying to gather up some old friends to make the gig.

I've heard of the Cubs . . . aren't they that minor league team that gets to play in that nice old, ivy covered ballpark?

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: AltheaRose Date: Jul 10, 2011 10:48pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

Married in the mid 70s? Wow. You must have been one of those Old Hippies Who Remembered the 60s and were, like, 28 years old.

As far as I knew, there was only one (non-college) radio station in Chicago -- WXRT. The rest was terra incognito, along with, say, local TV stations.

Did you end up making that show? It's just fantastic; it would have been wonderful to be there (although as of 10/29/77 I wasn't in Chicago and I'm not sure I'd even heard of the Dead. I know. Shocking, shocking. But they were very much under the radar for most folks and in most parts of the country, I'm pretty sure.)

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Jul 11, 2011 5:54am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

"Married in the mid 70s? Wow. You must have been one of those Old Hippies Who Remembered the 60s and were, like, 28 years old. As far as I knew, there was only one (non-college) radio station in Chicago -- WXRT"

I resemble that remark! - married in our mid-twenties in 1975 ! We lived in Detroit... and WLS Chicago had such a strong signal it was easily picked up most of the time 300 miles away in Detroit. You're right, the GD did not cross my radar until a college friend from Chicago (of all places) turned me on to them in 74-75. Overall, I'd agree they did not make the same impression in the middle of the country that they had on the coasts. Unless you were a regular reader of Rolling Stone.

Ed K. from Morton Grove, Ill - if you're out there - would like to be in touch...

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: duckpond74 Date: Jul 12, 2011 12:54pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

So unclejohn52, even though we got married in '78, we have been together since '74. Married relatively young at 23 and 22. See my response to AltheaRose for my lengthy response. I love the multi-generational make up of this site. Good wishes for many more years for you and your wife - partners for life!

So coming of age in Detroit, did you, by chance get to see Funkadelic live at Meadowbrook in Rochester in September '71? I have no idea whether you're a fan or not, but I've had several recent listenings to that amazing show on a commercially released CD on Westbound . The 15 minute version of 'Maggot Brain' is a monster groove and a half! Worth checking out if early psychedelic funk appeals to you.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Jul 13, 2011 5:57am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

A toast to you and yours, DP ! Sounds like 33 years and counting...

My music tastes were not as far-ranging or developed in the early 70s - at the time Funkadelic was not my cup of tea...(although I liked Sly & the Family, I was more limited to Beatles, Dylan, Blood Sweat&Tears, CSN&Y etc). Being a native of Detroit, I was certainly aware of all the fine music out of Motown - loved Smokey Robinson, the Four Tops and the Queen of Soul, Aretha, among others. Good times...

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: duckpond74 Date: Jul 13, 2011 7:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

Truth be told, even though my musical tastes were expanding like invasive weeds throughout the early 70's, I didn't get into Funkadelic until the mid to late 70's. Though from my early grade school days, I always loved the Motown hits. Smokey and the Miracles, the Temptations, The Supremes and Stevie Wonder and many more have etched their music into my permanent musical memories - my daughter is a huge Smokey Robinson fan. I recently was thrilled to pick up the Four Tops 'Reach Out' on vinyl - in great shape - for $1. I had stupidly sold my old copy, along with almost 2000 other LPs when we left Chicago right after that Grateful Dead August '80 run at the Uptown. That album is so 'dramatic'. Intense, but beautiful, heartfelt songs about the human condition ... I still find it quite relevant today. Great stuff! Levi Stubbs, what a great singer. Have you heard Billy Bragg's song 'Levi Stubb's Tears'? He obviously reached a lot of folks with his emotion-packed songs.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: TOOTMO Date: Jul 11, 2011 3:00pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

"... and WLS Chicago had such a strong signal it was easily picked up most of the time 300 miles away in Detroit. "

My first car was a 70 Plymouth Valiant. Its AM radio could pick up WLS, the Rock of Chicago, once the sun went down. Of course, at that time, I lived in northern Alabama. Can't hardly pick anything up where I live now, especially shortwave bands, because I have a big-ass chunk of iron ore in my backyard (at least that's my theory until DHM dissuades me.)

Over and out,
TOOTMO

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: staggerleib Date: Jul 11, 2011 11:43am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

I grew up in Wilmette. Still live in the area, actually. A mile away from Ravinia.

Favorite shows, as I've said before many times have been at the Uptown theatre, and at Alpine Valley.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: duckpond74 Date: Jul 12, 2011 10:03am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

We were married in '78, (I was 23, she was 22), but have been together since '74. Sometime in December this year, we are planning a 33 1/3 wedding anniversary, spinning some of the vinyl from 'those days'. My wife was a bigger 'head' than I when we first met. She fell out on the dead scene with the addition of Brent, Bob's rock star screaming, and the ever growing crowds that didn't follow the 'leave no trace' mindset.

I've been blessed / cursed with a pretty good memory of events from '62 on. I used to have a pretty solid and 'photographic' memory till recently. (As 3 Mustaphas 3 would say, "I'll never forget the day I lost my memory"). Age and the various pain meds have dulled the receptors and slowed down the 'pulling of the old files'. Do you recall that episode of 'Cosmos' on Memory and the Brain, with Carl Sagan in this massive warehouse full of file cabinets - 'hundreds, and hundreds' of them representing our memories, experiences, etc. - great image and concept.

"As far as I knew, there was only one (non-college) radio station in Chicago -- WXRT. The rest was terra incognito, along with, say, local TV stations."

WXRT was the biggest signal, but there was Triad Radio / WGLD, WFOX, and some fantastic little station out of the old Woodstock Opera House. Even WDAI was good in the early to mid '70's, broadcasting the Allman Brothers and Marshall Tucker live from the Fillmore East on New Year's day '73. There was one hip TV station WFLD - UHS ch. 29, that produced the "Underground News' and broadcast 'The Great American Dream Machine' with Marshall Efron along with cool european films from the Janus collection. Once again, that darn memory.

WXRT was the big powerhouse - and still hip - station then. There was a woman dj who did mornings in '72. I still remember her improving my hot, summer morning and making my day by playing Rose Hip String Band's 'Solar Emotions' back to back with the Ace version of 'Playing in the Band". Completely changed my mood before heading into work. See, that's what I mean about that memory biz. But more hip and influential was TRIAD Radio on WGLD from Oak Park. They were the ones who broadcast the 10/21/71 Dead / NRPS show. They only were on evenings and throughout the night. Incredible programming covering "both sides of the swamp". With lots of the San Francisco scene, the New York Scene and the Midwest scene as well as lots of British and European psych, rock, folk, prog, jazz, contemporary electronica - they had a huge influence on my musical tastes to this day. By the late 70's early 80's both 'XRT and Triad were losing their 'uniqueness'. The FOX broadcast from Elgin, it's studio was along side the Fox River. They had a small to moderate signal and covered much of the Fox River Valley. On a good day, their signal would last almost to Alpine Valley. They used to broadcast complete concerts recorded locally by Doc Watson, Muddy Waters and a young Pat Metheney. The small station out of Woodstock played mostly folk, bluegrass, some psych rock some imported stuff. They were a great low-key station that impressed a lot of folks.

As for the Dekalb 10/29/77 show, I ended up giving my ticket to a friend because I did not want to jeopardize my position having just started helping to run a fairly hip music club - out that way. No regrets, but would have liked to have been there. Between my friends' stories and hearing the tapes, it felt like I was there.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: dark.starz Date: Jul 10, 2011 1:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

" I've heard of the Cubs . . . aren't they that minor league team that gets to play in that nice old, ivy covered ballpark? "

That's funny, i believe they were offered a trial shot at the big leagues in 2007 and 2008 but fell once again consistent with the curse.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: jerlouvis Date: Jul 10, 2011 10:48am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

"Many folks west of the Mississippi don't realize just how short a drive it is from Philadelphia to Boston on I-95 and the massive concentration of people in such a relatively small geographical area"

I don't think you realize the length of that drive either,it is 309 miles or about 5 hours.I don't think a normal person considers 309 miles to be a short drive.It was eye opening information that a lot of people lived in that area between Philadelphia and Boston,who would have thought a 309 mile stretch on the east coast including NYC would result in a large population.I suppose next you are going to tell us that there are a lot of Indian and Chinese people in Asia.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: duckpond74 Date: Jul 10, 2011 11:35am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

Jerlouvis, I hope your comments were meant to be directed at dark.starz.

I would be deeply offended if you thought of me as part of the Kochman franchise.

btw, I have never driven between Boston and Philadelphia . . . I wouldn't have a clue about miles or time.

But glad to see you mention that Dark Star from 10/21/71. I don't visit that one as often as i used to - good reminder.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: jerlouvis Date: Jul 10, 2011 12:08pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

Of course that was directed at Kochman DP, I'm sorry if I didn't make that clear.I have made that drive many times having lived in NY most of my life and has unclejohn52 pointed out I was stating the absolute best case scenario.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: dark.starz Date: Jul 10, 2011 1:10pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

Drove the I-95 many times for business back in the late 70's and 80's up until late 2001 when the government made flying such a miserable experience.

Driving from California to Colorado is a short 24 hour drive as is Colorado to Illinois, done both several times.

Therfore, the 5 hour drive on I-95 from Philly to Boston is a short drive.

In terms of concentration in a metropolitan area, i believe Tokyo tops the world list @ 13 Million. Perhaps this explains the abnormal suicide rate in this highly congested area?

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: ringolevio Date: Jul 10, 2011 5:11pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

That drive is hellish, and there's no way to do it in less than 6 hours unless you are driving like a maniac.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: dark.starz Date: Jul 11, 2011 5:35am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

Ah yes,

Unless you depart @ 8 PM.



This post was modified by dark.starz on 2011-07-11 12:35:31

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: William Tell Date: Jul 10, 2011 12:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

Oh my gosh--first, LiA tells a funny, and now Rose gets testy, and starts an avalanche.

Ya gotta love this place. I'd say something silly like "you go girl" but that'd make Rob throw up, and I'd probably be slapped stupid, "virtually(?)", and rightfully so...nonetheless...great job, AR.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: Cliff Hucker Date: Jul 10, 2011 6:11am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

Kochman's delusion about being a head in the Chicago area is just another manifestation of his mental illness/Gulf War Syndrome.

He's never road tripped to a Grateful Dead show in his life. The only two GD performances that he attended were in the DC/Maryland area.

"Jer Bear?" Take your medication Koch...

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: dark.starz Date: Jul 10, 2011 4:46pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

Flipside/John Scher were the sponsors/promoter of Grateful Dead Concerts at The Auditorium Theatre from 1976 - 1977.

The Dekalb show was promoted locally by S.A. Concerts Committee, due to poor ticket sales, they not only dropped the cost of tickets, they promoted the concert the day of on the primary Chicago FM radio stations, WXRT etc.

If this show had been a John Scher production, we would have known several weeks in advance.

Reply to this post
Reply [edit]

Poster: dark.starz Date: Jul 11, 2011 6:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: ' In and around the Chicago Land in the 70's '

" How frustrating it was, night after night, to turn on the evening news shows, and not get any news of consequence that occurred outside of that 30 - 35 mile radius. Sometimes it felt that the media assumed - for us all - that nothing must be happening outside of that zone. "

Help me to understand how "Network" evening news broadcasts have evolved from the 70's?

Back in the day, Floyd Kalber on WMAQ NBC Chnl 5 and Bill Curtis WBBM CBS Chnl 2 both delivered reasonable news broadcasts particularly with all the compelling national news events that ocuured from 1968 up through 1974 when Nixon resigned.

We both know that not too much news worthy stuff ever happened in the suburbs away from the nastiness of the "Big City".